Empowering Clinicians in Perinatal and Infant Mental Health in Low Resource Communities 

Please join us Wednesday, January 13, 2021, from 12:30 PM to 2:00 PM EST as ZERO TO THREE Fellow, Muhammad Zeshan, MD, leads a discussion of his successful work piloting an Infant and Perinatal Mental Health Program in Pakistan.  This session will explore strategies to support parents struggling with PTSD, postpartum depression, or medical conditions. Learn what role cultural, religious, and social values have in building empathy and non-judgmental approaches for distressed families.

Dr. Zeshan is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School as well as a Board Member of NJ-AIMH.  He is the recipient of 10 national and international awards for academic excellence, teaching, leadership from the American Psychiatry Association, American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training, and Nishtar Alumni of North America.

Certificates will be awarded for 1 hour of Infant Mental Health Endorsement Competencies.

Practitioners can access 1.5 hours of Continuing Education Credits through participation and a $35 fee in addition to the registration fee.

Current NJ-AIMH Members: please click on the promo code space to draw down the appropriate NJAIMH2021 code for either the session alone or to add the CE fee to your member-discounted rate.

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Membership Renewals are due January 31, 2021

All NJ-AIMH membership renewals are due January 31, 2021.

  • Payment can be made via PayPal.  Please note you do not need a PayPal account to complete this transaction, you can pay as a “guest” via PayPal.
  • Alternately, you can mail a check to NJ-AIMH, PO Box 43662, Upper Montclair, NJ  07043.

Once we receive your payment, you will receive a confirmation email with your membership confirmation.


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Membership and Endorsement® Renewals due January 31, 2021

All NJ-AIMH membership and Endorsement® renewals are due January 31, 2021.

  • Payment can be made via PayPal.  Please note you do not need a PayPal account to complete this transaction, you can pay as a “guest” via PayPal.
  • Alternately, you can mail a check to NJ-AIMH, PO Box 43662, Upper Montclair, NJ  07043.

Once we receive your payment, you will receive a confirmation email with your membership confirmation.

If you are also renewing your Endorsement®, please click below for instructions for renewing via the Endorsement Application System (EASy).


My Info

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OPTIONAL - I identify racially/ethnically as:

Governor Murphy Issues Worker Protections Executive Order

Today, October 28, 2020, in response to months of advocates’ work, Governor Murphy signed a Worker Protections Executive Order. Despite workers getting sick and even dying, the federal government has only issued recommendations,  placing responsibility with the Governor to step up to ensure New Jersey workers’ health and safety from COVID-19 hazards.

The Worker Protections EO sets enforceable standards that virtually all employers must follow to protect their employees during the pandemic. These baseline standards include allowing proper social distancing, masks, sanitization, breaks for hand washing, notification of potential exposure to COVID-19 at the worksite, and following the requirements of applicable paid leave laws.

The Executive Order, which goes into effect on November 5th, mandates private and public employers implement uniform health and safety standards to protect all workers against the coronavirus, including:

Workers to keep at least 6 feet from each other “to the maximum extent possible.”
Workers and visitors to wear a face mask, with limited exceptions.
Employers to provide masks to workers at the company’s expense.
Employers to provide workers, customers, and visitors with sanitizing materials at the company’s expense.
Employers to conduct daily health checks of workers, such as temperature screenings, visual symptom checking, and more.
Employers to notify workers when there is possible exposure to the virus.
Employers to provide workers with breaks throughout the day to wash their hands.
Employers to routinely clean and disinfect frequently touched areas in accordance to state and federal guidelines.

The full EO can be read here.

The New Jersey Department of Labor (DOL) will launch a new webpage to field complaints from workers. The DOL and the Department of Health will both be able to investigate and enforce the EO. The state is also investing $400,000 in trainings so that workers can identify COVID-19 related workplace health and safety hazards and have the tools to be able to speak up when violations of the EO are not resolved by their employers.

Is Child Care Safe When School Isn’t? Ask An Early Educator.

The Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (CSCCE) at the University of California-Berkeley just last week published a great new read on their website, titled, “Is Child Care Safe When School Isn’t? Ask An Early Educator.” The illuminating article explores the fact that schools provide child care—not just education—and with in-person learning all-but evaporating for millions of K-12 students this fall, families are scrambling to find care amid the pandemic. The result? The essential service that is provided by schools on a daily basis is being sorely missed on both counts.

Report Examines Adverse Childhood Experiences in Early Childhood

A recent report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) examined U.S. Census Bureau’s National Survey of Children’s Health to better understand the prevalence of ACEs specifically in young children. CAP’s analysis found that more than 1 in 4 young children in the United States have been exposed to at least one ACE. Reflecting the societal patterns of America’s racial bias, the researchers also found that children of color are disproportionately more likely to have exposure to ACEs in early childhood.

A Pandemic within a Pandemic: How Coronavirus and Systemic Racism Are Harming Infants and Toddlers of Color

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP), released a new brief, A Pandemic within a Pandemic: How Coronavirus and Systemic Racism Are Harming Infants and Toddlers of Color, that unpacks the harm of systemic racism to children’s development and describes how the coronavirus pandemic has magnified pervasive inequities in health, education, employment, and other factors across race and ethnicity.

Programs that help families meet their basic needs urgently need immediate shoring up. And policymakers must prioritize families of color who are most harmed by the coronavirus. We make the case for focusing on the needs of families of color with infants and toddlers in coronavirus relief and systemic policy reform efforts to ensure that policies do not continue or add to inequities.

COVID-19 Resource from the United Kingdom on the First 1001 Days of a Child’s Life

This report captures the lockdown experiences of over 5000 families who responded to an online survey. The findings highlight the lack of support for families and the inequalities of babies’ early experiences. The report includes many case studies and statements from parents.

The evidence is unequivocal that the first 1,001 days of a child’s life, from conception to age two, lay the foundations for a happy and healthy life. Over 200,000 babies were born when lockdown was at its most restrictive, between 23rd March and 4th July. The Parent-Infant Foundation, together with Best Beginnings and Home-Start UK, conducted a survey of families’ experiences of lockdown during their babies’ first 1001 days, the findings of which suggest that the impact of lockdown on some of these babies could be severe and may be long-lasting.

  • The report describes the findings of an online survey of 5,474 expectant mothers, new parents, and parents of toddlers, undertaken during the pandemic. It shows that:
  • Almost 7 in 10 found their ability to cope with their pregnancy or baby had been impacted as a result of COVID-19
  • Nearly 7 in 10 felt the changes brought about by COVID-19 were affecting their unborn baby, baby or young child (with an increase in crying, tantrums, and becoming more clingy). This was felt most sharply amongst parents under 25 years old and those on the lowest incomes.

This report should be referenced as: Babies in Lockdown: listening to parents to build back better (2020). Best Beginnings, Home-Start UK, and the Parent-Infant FoundationBabies-in-Lockdown-Main-Report-FINAL-VERSION

Racial Trauma and Structural Racism Amidst COVID-19

An Interview with Drs. Sabrina Liu and Sheila Modir on race and trauma in the U.S.

COVID-19 has brought to the surface many racial inequities in the U.S., especially related to health disparities and access to resources. Compounding these negative effects are the burdens of both racial trauma and COVID-19-related trauma.

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