COVID-19 EMERGENCY RENTAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CVERAP)

Enrollment Period is Monday, July 6, 2020, at 9:00 am until Friday, July 10, 2020, at 5:00 pm

Completion of this pre-application does not guarantee placement in the COVID-19 ERAP.  

The COVID-19 Emergency Rental Assistance Program (CVERAP) will provide temporary rental assistance to low- and moderate-income households that have had a substantial reduction in income or became unemployed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Applicants may be eligible for a maximum of up to six months of emergency rental assistance.  The assistance will be capped at DCA’s fair market rent standard or the total of the rent, whichever is lesser. All participants will be reviewed at the three-month interval to see if they are still in need of assistance. Persons applying must meet all applicable CVERAP income and eligibility requirements. You must be eighteen (18) years of age or older to apply or be an emancipated minor.

Only one (1) pre-application per household will be acceptedAll participants will be selected through an online lottery process.

Anti-racism Resources

This document is intended to serve as a resource to white people and parents to deepen our anti-racism work. It includes books, videos, films, etc.

If you haven’t engaged in anti-racism work in the past, start now. Feel free to circulate this document on social media and with your friends, family, and colleagues.

 

 

Bias Isn’t Just A Police Problem, It’s A Preschool Problem

Bias is again making the news. It exists in each of us, consciously or unconsciously.

Research from the Yale Child Study Center suggests that many preschool teachers look for disruptive behavior in just one place, waiting for it to appear.

The problem with this strategy (besides it being inefficient), is that, because of implicit bias, teachers are spending too much time watching black boys and expecting the worst.

Listen to this NPR recording from 2016.

 

 

 

Our Babies Can’t Wait – A Statement from the Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health

As an affiliate of the Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health,
NJ-AIMH fully supports the following statement:

As part of the global infant/early childhood mental health community, we are committed to deepening conversation and promoting reflection and action to address ongoing bias, structural racism, and racial violence that impacts the health and wellbeing of all our babies and their families.

We believe in the power of relationships to raise a collective voice against racism.  We stand in solidarity with communities of color across the nation and the world and commit ourselves to mitigating the chronic trauma that racism has had on generations of children of color, their families, and the infant/early childhood workforce.

We hold in mind parents and caregivers of color who are tasked with protecting and creating a safe space for their babies while also managing their own emotions, as we also hold in mind the infant/early childhood mental health workforce of color who strive to hold and comfort families while managing their own emotions. 

We believe that change and healing starts with each one of us. We must intentionally examine the ways we contribute to the continuation or dismantling of racial trauma and structural oppression.

We must respond with purpose and action.  Our babies can’t wait.

With hope and love,

Staff and Board of Directors

Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health

 

POSTER: Supporting Young Children’s Social-Emotional Needs After Change

Relationships, routine, and supportive teaching of social-emotional skills have always been important.  After any big change, these become even more essential!  Here’s a poster from the Nebraska Association for Infant Mental Health with a few reminders of those important steps you can take towards ensuring young children’s social-emotional needs are met and they are able to thrive!

Rebuilding Your Child Care Organization Video

This video from the Exchange complimentary video series From Surviving to Thriving: Creating a Way Forward in Challenging Times is available!

Rebuilding Your Child Care Organization outlines the new economics of child care, key financial considerations, exploring new sources of income, and other important information and advice on rebuilding your child care organization.

Tips for Child Care Programs on Children’s Social-Emotional Needs in COVID-19

Relationships, routine, and supportive teaching of social-emotional skills have always been important.  After any big change, these become even more essential!  Here’s a poster from the Nebraska Association for Infant Mental Health with a few reminders of those important steps you can take towards ensuring young children’s social-emotional needs are met and they are able to thrive!

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