Resources

IECMH Clinical Workforce Solution Pathways

We are pleased to share a 5-part graphic that ZERO TO THREE just released!
IECMH Clinical Workforce Solution Pathways was co-created by stakeholders from around the country to capture the myriad of pathways of influence and opportunity related to increasing the size, diversity, quality, and accessibility of the Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) Clinical Workforce.
NJ-AIMH is pleased further to note that four of our members were a part of the contributors group: Gerry Costa, Kathy Mulrooney, Joaniko Kohchi, and Muhammad Zeshan, MD, our newest Board member, a current ZERO TO THREE Fellow.
Take a look at this wonderful document and join me in thanking our members for their work.

Report Examines Adverse Childhood Experiences in Early Childhood

A recent report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) examined U.S. Census Bureau’s National Survey of Children’s Health to better understand the prevalence of ACEs specifically in young children. CAP’s analysis found that more than 1 in 4 young children in the United States have been exposed to at least one ACE. Reflecting the societal patterns of America’s racial bias, the researchers also found that children of color are disproportionately more likely to have exposure to ACEs in early childhood.

White Paper on Social-Emotional Development from Too Small to Fail

How Young Children’s Learning & Health Benefit from Strong Social-Emotional Development

Very young children rely on parents and caregivers to help them understand our world and to provide them with the experiences and information that help their brains grow. This is true whether a child is learning to read and write, or how to get along with others and manage their feelings.  Too Small to Fail has released a white paper on the benefits that children receive through strong development.

Recommended Article: Inequality Begins at Birth

by Jeff Madrick

Over the past year, the lack of universal pre-kindergarten for American four-year-olds has become a national issue. In 2013, President Obama proposed to fund an ambitious new nationwide pre-kindergarten program through a new cigarette tax. That plan failed to gain support, but Bill de Blasio gave new urgency to the issue when he swept into the New York mayor’s office promising universal pre-K for all city children—which will begin in the fall. Even as these efforts are being made, however, new research is making it increasingly clear that educational disparities start much earlier. Read full article »

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